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Boys Anti-Tank Rifle PDF Print E-mail
Written by David Boyd   
Thursday, 01 January 2009 15:10

The Boys Anti-Tank Rifle

The Boys was the Anti-Tank rifle used by the British Army and Commonwealth during the Second World War. Even at the beginning of the war tank armour had progressed past the Boys ability to penetrate it, in saying that the majority of German tanks in the first year which were of obsolete designs were vulnerable as were Italian tanks, by 1941 a replacement for the Boys was sought and eventually the Boys was replaced by the PIAT in 1943. The Boys was still used in the far east where it could deal with Japanese armour.

Several countries used the Boys Anti-Tank rifle during the war, a large number was sent to France and it was used to equip many Commonwealth countries. 

The Boys fired a .55" AP round and was known for it's large recoil. There was at least 2 versions of the AP round fired by the Boys, the Mk II entering production around May 1940. 5 rounds were carried per magazine.

Boys Anti Tank Rifle characteristics

  Boys AT Rifle
Weight 36lb
Length 5'-4"
Calibre .55
Magazine weight 2lb 7 oz

 Boys Anti Tank Rifle performance

  Muzzle Velocity Projectile Weight Plate Angle 100 200 400 600 800 1000
Mk I 2500 0.133                
Mk II 2950 0.105lb HH 0 22 20.8 18.5 16.4 14.4 12.4
Mk II 2950 0.105lb HH 30 15 13.6 12.5 11.6 10.8 10.2

Production of Boys Anti Tank Rifles and ammunition by year (UK only)

  Pre War Sep-Dec 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945
Boys AT 11,161 4,201 13,827 7,313 22,319 6,225 - -
.55" AP 1,970,000 1,398,000 3,284,000 5,027,000 10,787,000 6,710,00 - -

 

Sources - AVIA 22 467-514,

 

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